Tag Archives: Career

With the current global situation, the demand for health professions is currently high. It is one of the sectors showing the most significant growth. What if you’re not interested in practical medical issues or your skills are more administrative? Have you ever considered working as a receptionist? Keep reading this article to find out if this profession is right for you!

 

So, What Does A Medical Receptionist Do?

medical receptionist is an integral part of the health care team. Nurses, doctors and other medical and administrative staff rely on medical receptionists to provide patients with a friendly, well-organised and welcoming service. As a medical receptionist, you’ll be responsible for all administrative matters relating to patient records. You will also be responsible for the smooth running of the reception and waiting area and maximising patient satisfaction. Medical administrative duties may vary from location to location, but in general, medical receptionists may also perform the following tasks:

  • Greet and assist patients in person and by telephone.
  • Scheduling appointments with patients.
  • Answer all incoming telephone calls courteously and professionally.
  • Maintaining confidentiality of all information about patients, staff and doctors.
  • Issuing invoices to patients.
  • Checking stock and inventory in the office.

 

The Personal Skills and Qualities Required

To work effectively in a medical office, receptionists need to have good interpersonal and administrative skills. A medical receptionist must be professional, discreet, caring, compassionate, and have excellent organisational skills to be successful. Attention to detail is important as they deal with confidential and sensitive information daily. A medical receptionist must be able to multi-task effectively, have excellent time management skills and provide a high level of customer service, whether in general practice, health clinic or hospital.

 

Breathtaking Professionalism

Receptionists are usually the first person a visitor or patient meets in person or on the phone. They represent the whole clinic in every encounter with the patient. Because receptionists have close contact with the public, they must have a friendly, warm yet professional attitude and provide unparalleled customer service. Greet everyone with a nice word and smile and show that you are ready to help.

 

Industry Experience

Because medical assistants work in doctors’ offices, health centres or hospitals, these individuals undoubtedly need a basic understanding of the industry and specific software. In general, a course in healthcare administration ensures that they are well versed in privacy laws, medical billing and medical terminology.

 

Effective Communication

Communication skills are a prerequisite for this professional role. In particular, a receptionist must listen well to find out what the patient needs and then help him or her. In addition to providing accurate information about the clinic, receptionists must make difficult phone calls, handle complex patient situations, and send clear messages and notifications to patients and other healthcare professionals, either verbally or in writing via text message or email.

 

Interpersonal Skills

Receptionists come into contact with many different personality types in pleasant and sometimes challenging circumstances. They need to be friendly and confident but also discreet and personable. Receptionists in medical offices also frequently interact with healthcare professionals, managers and other staff, and they must be collaborative, accept and give criticism gracefully, and rise above petty office politics. Good interpersonal skills go beyond basic communication skills. Soft skills such as kindness and sympathy are important for the receptionist profession.

 

Attention to Detail

Good receptionists need to be highly organised and detail-oriented to not forget about daily administrative tasks. After all, they need to keep up to date with information about themselves and perhaps about everyone else. They can find phone numbers and files at a glance and have a neat workspace.

 

Exceptional Time Management

Receptionists perform various tasks during the workday: scheduling appointments, taking calls, completing office tasks on time, and receiving and forwarding messages. This requires a high degree of multi-tasking and the ability to manage and prioritise time. A medical office assistant must be able to manage stress while performing office tasks quickly.

 

Technical Skills for Reception

Receptionists mainly use computers and telephones to communicate with staff and patients. They must therefore have basic keyboarding skills. The telephone system will probably have several internal and external lines that must be operated smoothly. You’ll also probably need to be familiar with word processing software packages. All receptionists should be comfortable using photocopiers, printers and telephone systems.

 

Do you want to work as a medical receptionist? Get in touch with the professionals at Doctors Secretarial Agency (DSA). Drawing on more than 36 years of experience, they offer staffing solutions for medical receptionists and medical transcription jobs.

 

 

 

Most employees and applicants will be required to take a drug test at least once during their careers. From the employer’s perspective, (illegal) drug use results in a higher level of absenteeism and decreased productivity, among other adverse factors. Additionally, many employers implement drug screening procedures before hiring (and sometimes after hiring) to protect themselves from liability for their workers’ actions. And while many workers believe that drug testing violates their right to privacy, employers often have the protection of the law, as long as they comply with state and federal regulations and apply the policy equally. This article deals with the legality of drug testing, both before and after hiring.

 

Drug Testing Before Hiring

With a few exceptions, private employers may require new hires to take a drug test for the first time as a condition of employment. Applicants have the right to refuse the test, but such refusal usually implies the job offer’s rejection. Unlike on-the-job drug testing, it does not need to be justified by safety considerations or other employment-related concerns beyond the desire to achieve a drug-free work environment when it is done before hiring.

Union members may not be required to submit to a narcotics test before hiring (or after) unless such testing programs are specifically negotiated and addressed in union contracts. While the U.S. Constitution does not protect private-sector employees from what could be considered privacy invasion, some states have laws that limit employers’ rights to test employees (or applicants) drug detection.

 

Drug Testing During Employment

Many states have laws limiting the conditions under which an employer can require employees to take a drug test. Typically, employers must justify testing employees with business or safety needs or respond to suspected use of drugs such as opioids, hallucinogens, or pain relievers.

In general, while they differ by state, testing employees for illegal drug use is permitted under the following circumstances:

  • The employer’s job poses a significant danger to the safety of yourself or others.
  • The employee is enrolled in a drug rehab program or has just been discharged from such a program.
  • The employee was involved in a workplace incident in which drug use is suspected.
  • Management has a reasonable suspicion that a particular employee has been using illegal drugs based on behavior or physical evidence.

State and federal regulations require employees in certain professions to be tested for drugs, including airline pilots and those who operate heavy machinery. If you’re unsure about the drug testing requirements for your job, contact the appropriate professional organization.

Invasion of privacy

Attempts to avoid drug testing because it violates employee privacy have been unsuccessful. That’s because the tests themselves do generally not violate an individual’s rights, although sometimes the way the test is performed (or the use of the results) may constitute a violation.

For example, the U.S. Supreme Court held that positive drug test results could not be used in subsequent criminal cases without the employee’s consent. Also, a drug test can be challenged on constitutional grounds if the results are indiscriminately disclosed, if the test is performed in a way that violates the person’s right to privacy, or if the test is performed excessively or improperly.

 

Medical Marijuana

At least 33 states have enacted laws that allow medical marijuana use by patients with health problems. Still, employees in those states are not required to provide reasonable accommodation to people who use medical marijuana. In other words, employers are free to ignore a legitimate state-issued medical marijuana certificate. One of the legal reasons behind this situation is that employers could be liable for any work-related injury caused by an employee whose marijuana test was positive, whether or not it is for medicinal use.

 

State Laws About Drug Testing

Most states have laws that address the implementation of workplace drug tests, either by limiting the circumstances under which the tests can be done or by providing incentives to employers to implement such tests.

The following is a brief sample of state policies on drug testing:

  • California: Employers who obtain state contracts or grants must certify that they will provide a drug-free work environment (similar to the federal requirement); Contractors must also provide a written policy to their employees.
  • Florida: State law gives priority to contractors who have implemented a procedure for a drug-free work environment, receiving a discount on your premiums for workers’ compensation.
  • Illinois: There is no legislation regarding drug testing.
  • New York: Does not have legislation regarding drug testing; state courts have supported the random implementation of drug and alcohol testing of city bus drivers, police officers, and correctional officers.
  • Texas: Businesses with more than 15 employees (and coverage for workers’ compensation) should adopt the workplace drug reduction policy of their choice.

 

Are you looking for experts to carry out drug testing? Look no further than  Brevard Background Check! They provide highly reliable and accurate drug testing services in Brevard County and cater to businesses, professional organizations, and other institutions to help them identify drug addictions in their workplace.

 

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