Tag Archives: E-Commerce

Welcome back to part 2 of our e-commerce search engine optimization crash course. As we mentioned in part one, this article was developed with help from our friends at Linkeo Ltd. Today, we’ll be looking at detailed instructions for an effective e-commerce SEO strategy, starting with:

Use the Right Keywords

Yes, keywords still matter. While you don’t want to overload your product titles and descriptions with these keywords, they do still need to be present in the copy.

Mention your primary keyword in your product headline, description, meta description, image alternate attributes, and sub-headers. Sprinkle latent semantic index (LSI) keywords throughout. These are related keywords that help Google understand your page in context.

Before you use a keyword, do some research on it. Know how often people search for it (keyword search volume), how competitive it is in the paid advertising space (cost-per-click, or CPC) and what people are looking for when they use that keyword. Why are these factors important? Let’s analyze this further.

Search volume tells you how much interest a particular keyword inspires in consumers. A high search volume indicates greater popularity, which means you’ll get more active searches for that keyword.

CPC tells you how much people pay per click when they buy advertising based on a specific keyword. A high CPC indicates increased competition. If your target keyword is extremely competitive, consider finding an alternative.

Finally, user intent describes what people want to find when they type a specific keyword into Google’s search bar. Let’s say, for instance, that someone looks up showers – does that person want information about shower installation, shower repair, baby showers, bridal showers or something else entirely? If you can’t determine the user intent behind a keyword, add other words to the search string for clarity.

Conduct Competitor Research

If you have no clue where to start with on-site optimization for your e-commerce site, then your competitors are your best bet. Larger competitors, in particular, have probably already put in the legwork for optimizing their websites, and you can learn many of their secrets on their websites themselves.

Keywords are the thing you need to focus on. Particularly, you’ll want to analyze the keywords on their homepages as well as their top product pages.

How can you tell if a website is optimizing for a particular keyword? There are many free browser extensions you can use to see the SEO title and description your competitors use in their title tags. You can also use these tools to see what keywords your competitors are ranking for on both organic and paid searches.

Don’t stop your research with keywords. Check out your competitors’ landing pages too, so you can see how they use the specified keywords to optimize those pages.

Focus on Homepage SEO

The homepage is typically where most businesses focus their SEO budget and energy. While it is definitely one of the top pages of your website to optimize, it is by no means the only one you should focus on. That said, you do want to optimize your homepage well.

This will include focusing on:

Homepage Title Tag: The SEO title tag is one of the most important elements of on-site search optimization. It should include your business name along with the main keyword phrase you are targeting. You should write this title tag in less than 70 characters and in a way that is appealing to search visitors, as they will see it in search results.

Homepage Meta Description: While this is not important as far as keyword rankings, the meta description for your homepage is a 160-character description of your business that will also show up in search beneath the title tag. Write it in a way that encourages people to want to visit your website.

Homepage Content: The content on your homepage should help visitors learn more about your business and the products you have to offer in a clear and concise way. Avoid overloading visitors with too much information. Consider featuring your top few products on the homepage and your unique selling proposition.

Cluttered homepages can confuse visitors as well as search engines. For instance, maybe you sell products in many different categories. Google will struggle to identify what you sell and who you’re targeting with your products, so get specific about what your site offers.

That’s all we have time for today. In our next article, we’ll delve into how internal links and simplifying your site architecture can go a long way to improving your overall SEO. As always, be sure to leave your thoughts, opinions and questions in the comments section below.

If you want to get more traffic and sales to your e-commerce website, then on-page SEO is a critical first step.

There’s a multitude of how-to articles and tutorials on the web offering general SEO advice, but far fewer that specifically address the needs of e-commerce entrepreneurs the same way that the experts at Linkeo Ltd do through their innovative Deliver By Linkeo platform.

Today, we’ve partnered with the Linkeo team to bring you a series of articles that aim to give you a basic understanding of on-site search engine optimization for e-commerce. It will be enough to get you started, make sure you’re sending all the right signals to Google, and set you up for SEO success.

First off…

What is E-Commerce SEO?

E-commerce SEO is the process of making your online store more visible in the search engine results pages (SERPs). When people search for products that you sell, you want to rank as highly as possible so you get more traffic. You can get traffic from paid search, but SEO costs much less. Plus, ad blockers and ad blindness can reduce the effectiveness of paid search, so you’ll want to optimize for search regardless.

E-commerce SEO usually involves optimizing your headlines, product descriptions, metadata, internal link structure, and navigational structure for search and user experience. Each product you sell should have a dedicated page designed to draw traffic from search engines.

However, you don’t want to forget about static, non-product-oriented pages on your site, such as the following:

  • Homepage

  • About page

  • F.A.Q. page

  • Blog articles

  • Help center answers

  • Contact page

Create a list of keywords for those pages as well as related keywords. There are several online resources that make it easy to search for one long-tail keyword and find semantic keywords that go well with it.

Why SEO For E-Commerce Matters

What do consumers do when they need a product or service? Many perform Google searches. They’re looking for options, tips, comparisons, and other information to help them make informed decisions.

If your website doesn’t appear in the SERPs, you lose critical access to qualified and interested e-commerce customers. Your products might have a space on the web, but are they visible?

That’s where e-commerce SEO comes in. It provides you with a way to reach your target audience without paying for ads. Once you get people to your site, you can delight them with your high-quality products, intriguing copy, and motivating calls to action.

How to Develop an E-Commerce SEO Strategy

E-commerce SEO might seem like a huge task, especially if you already have a website populated with tons of products. Yes, it might take time, but you can speed up the process with a solid strategy.

Prioritize pages: Which pages on your site get the most traffic? Start with them. Additionally, if you want people to focus on a specific or flagship product, optimize for that product first.

Create a workflow: SEO requires you to meet lots of specific requirements. Choosing keywords, adding metadata, naming your images correctly, adding image alternate attributes, and incorporating related keywords all fall under this category.

Check out the competition: Your e-commerce SEO strategy should be designed to outwit the competition. Look at your top competitors’ sites and check out their SEO efforts. Identify ways to make yours better.

Follow through with CRO: Conversion rate optimization (CRO) should follow SEO. We’ll be returning to this topic in more detail later on in the series, so just keep this term in mind for the time being.

That’s all for the first part of our e-commerce SEO series. In the next part, we’ll be looking at the most important aspects to consider when developing your SEO strategy. In the meantime, be sure to leave your thoughts, opinions and questions in the comments below.

It’s no real secret that working with online influencers to promote your brand can yield some great rewards. Finding influencers is becoming much easier to find thanks to marketplaces and search tools, but finding the RIGHT influencers is much more of a challenge. If you want your influencer marketing campaign to bring an impressive ROI, you need to recruit influencers with the creative skills and audience makeup that is the right fit for your brand.

We’ve teamed with the experts at Linkeo Ltd once more to bring you 7 simple steps you can take to ensure your influencers have what it takes to help drive your marketing goals.

Define Your Goals

No matter what marketing task you’re up to, goals always need to be the first step. Your goals will help you figure out what kind of influencer content you’ll need to create, which platforms you want your influencers to publish it on, and what kind of influencers are the best for your brand.

Say your goal is to make your influential consumers more loyal (a popular brand objective). In this case, finding the right influencers is easy. Engage in social listening and track your brand mentions across the web. Identify influential people who are already talking about your business or products, and then you can recruit these influencers to do so in an official capacity.

Pick Your Platform(s)

Valuable influencers exist on many platforms around the web – not just Instagram and YouTube. And many businesses are just starting to take advantage of these options. For example, several fairly large e-commerces and big businesses have recently started working with Snapchat influencers to help connect with the platform’s younger audience.

So before you start looking for influencers, you need to figure out which platforms your target audience engages on most. The platform you pick will depend on where you want to reach your audience and what kind of influencer content you want to create.

Say you want to make a 5-minute branded video with your influencer. You’ll want to consider all video platforms, and even think about a livestream video campaign. If you want a blogger to review your product, you might also consider having them write a blog post and share the post on their social media profiles.

Once you know what platforms you want your influencer content to appear on, you can narrow down your search for influencers immensely.

Micro or Macro?

Next you need to decide how “big” of an influencer you want to find. Say your brand sells natural skin care products. Do you want to team up with one of the biggest bloggers in the niche, or find a team of a few micro-influencers all with around 5,000 followers on Instagram?

Don’t underestimate the power of working with micro-influencers in this case. Micro-influencers tend to have a highly-engaged niche audience that values the influencer’s recommendations as a peer. If you work with micro-influencers, all you’ll need to do is build a team of them in order to scale your campaign.

 

Narrow down by Niche

Celebrity endorsements were a precursor to what we know as influencer marketing today. Get nearly any celebrity to say they like your products and you’re bound to see an increase in sales.

Let’s go back to the organic makeup brand example. They wouldn’t want to look for Instagram users who simply offer makeup tips to their audience. They need to find influencers who actually have a genuine interest in and use organic makeup products. The more relevant an influencer is to your brand’s niche, the more likely it is that their audience will respond to their recommendations. So unless a generalist has some other ability that makes them valuable to your influencer marketing campaign, look past them to find the best niche influencers for your brand.

Evaluate Engagement

Once you’ve found a few macro- or micro-influencers relevant to your business niche, take some time to look at how effective they are at engaging their audience. Take a scroll through their most recent posts:

  • Do they get a lot of likes/shares?

  • Do they get a lot of comments?

  • What is the sentiment of those comments?

  • Does the influencer encourage engagement by responding to comments?

  • If you’re working with a blogger or YouTuber, does their content get a lot of shares on other social sites?

If you’re using an influencer marketing platform to find leads, they may have some engagement metrics available to help you evaluate potential influencers. A good platform is one that uses engagement data sorted by platform to suggest how much brands should compensate an influencer for their services.

Brainstorm Content Together

Once you think you’ve found the right influencer to work with, ask them to work together to brainstorm and create content around your brand. Giving your influencers some creative freedom in this respect is a great way to evaluate whether they’re really a good fit to work with your brand. If an influencer can’t come up with a genuine positive comment about your product/brand, then they’re probably not a good person to work with in the first place.

Take A Few Influencers for a Test Run

If you followed steps 1-6, you’ve already gone a long way to ensure your influencers can effectively help promote your brand and meet your marketing goals. You should have enough confidence to put them through one last test — create and share your influencer content, and then monitor the results. Even if an influencer has an engaged audience, you won’t know how that audience will respond to your branded message specifically until you try it on them. Keep track of the performance of your individual influencers so you can evaluate which is the most effective at driving your marketing goals.

Do this repeatedly with each new influencer you find, and you’ll be able to build a team of powerful brand advocates to broaden reach, help you find new leads, drive sales, encourage retention, and more.

Remember these 7 steps when you conduct influencer research, and you’ll be well on your way to finding the best influencers for your brand’s needs. Are you already working with influencers? Share your views and experiences in the comments section below.

All E-commerce business owners know that for their brand to thrive they need sales. Crucially, they need sales from new customers, but those don’t always come easy. This leaves many trying to answer the essential question: “How do I generate potential E-commerce leads to my website?”

Creating a bullet-proof lead generation machine that fuels business growth by attracting high-value leads, or those consumers most likely to make purchases, comes down to building and executing an E-commerce strategy.

What Is Lead Generation in E-commerce?

A lead is simply a person who’s interested in your brand, products, or services and takes an action to demonstrate that interest. This could involve anything from clicking on your ad campaign to signing up for a free trial. Each lead is a potential customer. Every action a lead takes provides valuable data. You can use this data to convert a lead into a paying customer and inform your overall lead generation strategy.

Who Is Your Ideal Lead?

Having a deep understanding of your ideal lead is the first step in streamlining your marketing efforts and bringing more qualified leads. You may have a general idea about your target customers’ characteristics, behaviors and motivations, but you must develop buyer personas based on data, not assumptions. Start creating a buyer persona using qualitative data from your site analytics, industry reports, and competitor research. Combine this with quantitative research from customer interviews and online discussions around your brand and products.

Having a clear picture of your ideal lead helps you improve the targeting of your marketing campaigns, create more impactful blog content and provide irresistible offers or promotions. You might even discover that you should tweak your product inventory or services to better serve your customers’ needs. After all, if you sell each customer three items instead of one, you’re well on your way to skyrocketing profits without any additional lead gen expenses.

Now, let’s get into how you generate more traffic. Keep in mind that more traffic in and of itself doesn’t equal leads. The goal is to make sure your ideal leads fill your traffic.

Optimize for Search Engines (SEO)

Industry reports state that 75% of users never scroll beyond the first page of search results. Clinching one of those coveted ten spots is the holy grail. E-commerce brands have many digital assets. Optimize those assets with keywords and phrases and you increase your chances of landing on page one. A well-executed SEO strategy peppers search terms across product descriptions, blog content, and metadata, turning each one into a lead magnet.

Many businesses skip out on optimizing their image alt-tags. This is a mistake. Google found that 50% of online shoppers rely on images when deciding what to buy. Now that search results prioritize images, taking the extra time to optimize every product image can pay off with leads that are ready to buy.

Write Valuable Content

Content generates strong leads by piquing a user’s interest. The more content you have, the more likely it is that a consumer will encounter it. The general consensus is that 70% of people prefer to learn about a product from an article over an ad. A recent marketing survey also found that brands using content marketing have six times higher conversion rates than brands that don’t produce content.

Build Your Social Media Followers

According to several reports, there are almost 4.2 billion social media users, and they spend an average of 2 hours and 25 minutes per day on social platforms. This makes social media a goldmine for E-commerce lead generation. Put your efforts towards a few select channels where your buyers spend most of their time.

Use Email Marketing

Email marketing is a relatively inexpensive E-commerce lead-generation technique that delivers an ROI of up to 4400%, or $44 for every $1 spent on a campaign. Consumers have become more protective of their email addresses over the past few years, so they may need some encouragement to hand them over. Entice them with a discount sent straight to their inboxes. You’ll see leads convert to customers and sales roll in.

Optimize Conversion Rates (CRO)

If you’re bringing traffic to your site, but leads aren’t converting to sales, it’s time to revisit your analytics and determine the causes leading to customer drop-offs. You can optimize every element of your site. Once you identify an area for improvement, optimize it. Some changes can be cut and dry, while others need to be tested. Don’t make changes solely based on assumptions. Continue to test one element at a time and check your data before making final decisions.

Take Advantage of Cookies

Cookies collect and store information from a visitor’s session, including the items they clicked on or added to their cart, even if they didn’t check out. Use this cookie data to retarget past visitors and show them personalized ads featuring the products they viewed. You can launch your remarketing campaigns on social media channels or other sites using Google AdWords. To comply with all international laws, include a cookie policy on your website.

Offer Discounts and Deals

You spent time and money bringing E-commerce leads to your site. The fastest way to convert leads into paying customers is to tempt them with deals or discounts. The incentive to buy needn’t be enormous; it can be as simple as 15% off or free shipping. You can also use discounts to increase your average order value with an offer such as, Get $15 off a purchase of $75 or more. It sounds counter-intuitive, but consumers will add extra items to their cart to take advantage of the deal, often exceeding the minimum purchase required.

Optimize for Mobile

A sure-fire way to increase lead generation for E-commerce sites is to provide users with a stellar mobile experience. Optimizing for mobile requires you to test your site on devices of all sizes. Ensure that buttons, menus, search bars, and forms are easy to use, content is the right size, and scrolling is a cinch. There are certain site building and hosting companies, like Linkeo Ltd and their Deliver by Linkeo platform, that build sites that are optimized for all devices as standard.

It’s a challenge to establish brands in the E-commerce industry as it’s a crowded market. To succeed, first you must have a deep understanding of who your ideal customer is. Then implement lead-generation strategies to fill your traffic with high-quality, targeted users. We hope the tips outlined in this article go some way to helping you achieve that goal. Share your views in the comments section below and be sure to check back for new content in the coming weeks.

E-commerce platforms offer unlimited opportunities for small to midsize businesses to increase sales, but they are also prime targets for cybercrime and online fraud, due to their lower probability of having robust online security in place to protect customers’ payment data. Unlike major corporations who enjoy the luxury of having their own in-house IT security providers or consultants, most small and midsize e-commerces are bootstrapping their businesses on limited budgets. To make matters worse, recent studies have shown that hackers are migrating to the new automation malware trend. By automating their threat software, cybercriminals can target large swaths of e-commerces rather than attacking them one at a time.

In this article, we will look at five steps you can take to secure your e-commerce website. Starting with a classic suggestion:

Promote Good Password Hygiene

While passwords are experiencing competition from technologies such as facial recognition and multifactor authentication (MFA), they’re still the standard access keys to most software. We need passwords for every service or website we log onto. For most users, it is common practice to use the same password for multiple services. The problem with this approach is that, once the reused usernames and passwords have been taken by hackers, they can be applied to various services, leading to widespread fraud.

If your sticking to passwords on your site for the time being, remember they should require a minimum number of characters (at least six, preferably eight to 10) and use numbers and symbols. It is also advisable to force users change their passwords regularly. And if you can afford it, look into investing in two-factor authentication (2FA) from users and customers. This can ensure that users don’t rehash potentially compromised credentials, and it goes a long way towards making sure that those requesting access are who they say they are.

Use HTTPS

HyperText Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) is the online protocol for secure communications over the internet and one of the easiest ways to help secure your e-commerce website from fraud. Designated by a closed green lock icon on the browser address bar, HTTPS websites are deemed authentic and secure because they’re certified. This means the website really is what it’s claiming to be and not a counterfeit website placed online to fool users so that bad guys can grab access credentials, credit card data, and more.

To enable HTTPS, you will need to acquire a Secure Socket Layer (SSL) certificate. Receiving an SSL certificate is the first step, this now needs to be implemented carefully in your e-commerce solution. Certain web designing and hosting companies can handle this step for you.

The advantages of using HTTPS go beyond security and trustworthiness. Google gives secure HTTPS websites a higher search ranking, leading to more visitors. Conversely, Google also labels unencrypted websites as “not secure,” which makes them appear sketchy and unsafe. These days, there’s few faster ways to get a potential customer to skip your website than to not have HTTPS

Choose a Secure E-Commerce Platform

E-commerce platforms are usually picked for their storefront-building convenience, range of design, and functionality, but security features need to be top of mind, too. Look for proven e-commerce solutions that provide encrypted payment gateways, SSL certificates, and solid authentication protocols for sellers and buyers, like Linkeo Ltd.

Don’t Store Sensitive User Data

Consumer privacy is critical in e-commerce. Businesses need customer data to improve their communications and product offerings as well as make it easy to return purchases. The danger is that website hacking, phishing, and other cyberattacks target this user data.

The first rule is to only collect data that’s useful for the purposes of fulfilling the transaction. Businesses should avoid the temptation of collecting more customer data than is absolutely necessary. This applies specifically to customer credit card information. There’s no need to store them on online servers, which can be a violation of the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), which serves to enforce consumer data protection in the payment card industry.

Cybercriminals and hackers can’t steal what isn’t there, so keeping the valuable personal and financial information of your users should be kept secure and off of online servers. If you have to store certain data, then make sure it’s protected in a safe, online storage repository that observes best practices when it comes to keeping information safe. This should include having stringent access controls, regular audits, and, most importantly, total data encryption.

Maintain a Security-Focused Mindset

E-commerce security is never a one-and-done deal. Threats and hacking methodologies evolve at an alarming rate, and maintaining an awareness and a security-focused mindset is the necessary preventive method. Once your e-commerce website’s security has been compromised, it is often too late. All a business can do at that point is costly and embarrassing damage control.

The real challenge for all businesses is effectively implementing e-commerce authentication and security measures in a frictionless manner so the customer experience is not impacted—and then staying on top of evolving threats without breaking the budget on security.

If you want to know more about these issues, feel free to drop us a comment below and let us know what topics you would like us to cover.

As an e-commerce, it’s almost a given that the bulk of your clients will be making payments online. Ensuring you have a working knowledge of how the payment process works is therefore vital. In this article, we will therefore be looking at a few key topics, namely: how the online payment process works, which parties need to be involved, and how much it will cost to take online payments.

The Basics

In essence, online payments work in much the same way as face-to-face payments, with a few added steps. There are a minimum of six parties involved with all online payments. The first is obviously your customer, and the second is yourself.

The ‘middlemen’, as it were, include: A payment ‘gateway’, which is a piece of software that sits behind your online shop. The gateway handles the online transaction, and then securely sends your customer’s payment information to your payment processing company who, as the name implies, handles all payment processing on your behalf. In most cases this will be your bank, although there are numerous third-party that also offer this service. You will also need to deal with the payment network which the customer’s card is linked to, e.g. Visa or PayPal. This network acts as the go-between for the customer’s and your bank.

Let’s now look at a typical online payment journey:

  1. The customer enters their payment information (e.g. debit card or PayPal details) into an online checkout form, so they can pay for something.

  2. The payment gateway securely sends that data to the payment processing company.

  3. The payment processing company then sends that data to the card scheme.

  4. The card scheme checks with the customer’s bank to see if they have enough money to make the purchase, and that the card isn’t blocked.

  5. If the payment is accepted, the money is taken from the customer’s bank account and held by the merchant’s payment processing company.

  6. The payment gateway confirms the sale to both the customer and the merchant.

  7. At the end of each trading day, the payment processing company sends the money from all the merchant’s sales to their bank account.

  8. The money normally arrives in the merchant’s bank account within 2-3 working days.

  9. The payment processing company’s fees for each sale are added to the merchant statement and are billed at the end of the month. The merchant usually pays these fees by Direct Debit.

This last part leads us quite nicely to our next point:

What Charges are Involved in Online Payment Systems?

On top of costs for setting up your website (e.g. web development, web hosting, shopping cart software and plugins), you’ll also have fees for taking payments online. The cost of taking payments online depends on several factors, including: the volume of transactions, the kinds of transactions you’ll be processing, gateway fees, and the fees your payment processing company charges. The fees and considerations generally come under the following categories:

Contract length and type: The length and type of your contract can vary. Make sure you factor in both costs as well as contract length when you’re choosing a gateway supplier.

Set-up fees: Usually a flat, one-time fee to cover the costs of setting up a new merchant account.

Gateway fees: Usually a fixed, monthly fee; plus a per-transaction fee, which might be fixed or variable. These come from your gateway provider.

Transaction fees: Also known as ‘Merchant Service Charges’, these come from your payment processing company. Each time you take a payment, you get charged a small percentage of the payment’s value. These charges can vary depending on the type of transaction (e.g. debit cards generally cost less to process than credit cards) and the volumes of transactions (higher volumes can get you cheaper rates). Transaction fees normally cover the ‘interchange fee’ that an acquirer pays for using the payment scheme’s network. You’ll also be charged a transaction fee for each refund.

Other fees: May include fees for things like: disputed cardholder transactions (also known as a chargeback), security fees, or early cancellation fees and solution modules (such as extra fraud checkers)

We hope the information in this article has proven useful in helping you understand the basics of online payment processing and what it means for your business. Here at Linkeo Ltd, we can assist you with setting up robust and easy-to-navigate payment portals as part of our web-building and hosting services. Feel free to get in touch if you have any further queries. And if you have anything you’d like to share, feel free to leave us a comment below.

While restaurants and cafes used to have to deliver the food themselves, the process has undergone quite a few changes in recent years, with the advent of online food delivery platforms, with UberEats, Deliveroo and GrubHub as newer examples.

If you’re looking to create your own delivery platform, there are several things we can learn from these businesses. Let’s dive into some of the key features that can ensure your own platform will enjoy a fair level of success at the very least.

Must-Have Features to Build an Attractive Food Delivery Platform

If your aim is to drive your business to greater heights and provide an exceptional user-experience at the same time, your online food delivery platform must be equipped with advanced UI features. The list below contains a selection of some of the cutting-edge features you should definitely consider adding to your own platform.

An Aesthetically Designed Homepage and Intuitive User Interface

Aesthetics and intuitive design are the cornerstones to driving deeper user engagement. Your homepage should be pleasing to the eye, and easy to navigate with a clear navigation interface. Some of the key features to consider include:

  • The top banner housing all the main components like log-in/register.
  • A strategically designed banner image showing exquisite culinary food dishes. This is essential in enticing users to order food online.
  • A compelling tagline that makes your service seem more welcoming.
  • As most of these services are location-based, you must incorporate a search bar along with the location tracker on the homepage itself.

A ‘How It Works’ Section

One of the major goals of any new platform catering to a niche market is to make its novice users aware of how the platform works. Therefore, your food ordering and delivery portal ought to have a dedicated section, which guides users to perform various operations on the marketplace. It’s vital to place major emphasis on the design of this page.

Reviews & Ratings

Your food delivery marketplace must enable the customers to give reviews and ratings on your service and food. This will help you evaluate your offerings and make the necessary adjustments.  Also, businesses are beginning to realize the importance of customer reviews to enhance their brand identity as reviews highly influence the decision-making process of new customers on where to order their food from.

Login/Signup

When it comes to the login/signup process on an online food delivery platform, it needs to be as simple, intuitive and should take the least amount of time possible to complete. This is because your aim should be to streamline the food ordering process. Rather than using a dedicated login page, your website can use a popup. Users can either use one-click login via Facebook/Google/Twitter or go for the traditional way of logging in with a username and password.

To expand your reach to a wider audience and deliver a personalized experience to the customers, your online food delivery platform should incorporate multilingual functionality. Enabling customers to search and operate in their language helps you enhance customer engagement.

Account Activation

In order to eliminate spam accounts and build a strong user base, you can also have a pre-activation verification system in place, where you require users to confirm their email to activate their accounts. Alternatively, you can also add an OTP service in place to verify via mobile number.

Customer Dashboard

A comprehensive user dashboard helps customers easily manage their account details and keep track of their activities on your app. The customer dashboard should be designed in a way that the customers can easily access the information and manage their account on the platform. The dashboard can include such features as:

Wallet – allowing customers to add funds to an online wallet will save them needing to enter their credit card details each time they place an order, and also improve online security.

Delivery Address – Users generally tend to order food from their homes as well as offices on a regular basis, making an option where users can add default addresses comes in handy. This makes it easier for users to order food quickly, eliminating the hassle of filling the same addresses again and again.

A “Your Orders” Section – For a better user experience, your online food ordering and delivery platform must have a dedicated section for customers to view their current and past orders.

Another excellent feature that appears to be making waves in the current global climate is:

Geofencing for Seamless User Experience

Features like Geofencing could play a crucial role in providing superior customer experiences and increase your restaurant’s sales. With geofencing, you can set virtual boundaries marking locations where you deliver and notify the customers when they enter that predefined location. This location-based service can ensure safer deliveries during the ongoing pandemic.

Final Thoughts

In recent years, the food ordering market has grown rapidly. Rather than going to an eatery, people prefer to order food online. This has resulted in huge demand for online food delivery and the outcome is the rise of platforms like Grubhub, Deliveroo, and Uber Eats.

If you want accelerated growth for your online food delivering business, your solution should be equipped with exclusive functionalities and impressive features. This would surely help you in capturing the bulk of the market share and driving exponential business growth. If you need an expert team to help you get started, why not get in contact with Linkeo Ltd and enquire about their Deliver by Linkeo project.

Did you know that many e-commerces fail because of their delivery options? It might be the cost is too high, the lack of delivery options, or quite simply that customers don’t trust the delivery promise. Therefore, you can drastically improve your online sales by simply focusing some attention on your delivery strategy and acting upon areas that your customers feel need work.

Let’s look at what we mean by delivery strategy.

Your delivery strategy covers everything to do with the delivery of your products and will be dictated by what your customers expect of you. Everything from how you present the delivery information on your e-commerce website and in your marketing, right down to the product that arrives on the doorstep will be shaped by these demands, as well as your ability to meet these requirements in terms of volumes, finances, or manpower.

How Can Your Delivery Strategy Increase Sales?

As previously mentioned, delivery is one of the main reasons why people don’t buy online, so how can you entice people to trust you? Quite simply, you need to offer the kind of delivery options your customers want. Survey your regulars to see whether speed, convenience or cost is the most important for your customers. This is especially important if you’re running a specialist business like a cheese shop or vintner. Once you’ve identified what your clients want, find the couriers that can best serve your needs.

The delivery space is one of the fastest-growing aspects of e-commerce at the present time, and the options for smaller businesses are constantly improving. This makes it well worth scouting the marketplace periodically to make sure you have the best delivery service for your business.

Once you have the right services in place, make sure you are presenting them clearly on your website. You need to get it right in all these places:

  • On every page: a header with the headline offering, and then a link to the delivery options. Avoid hiding the prices.
  • Clear information on every product page. Is it in stock? When will it dispatch? Relevant postage prices.
  • Clearly explain it on the checkout and basket pages too.

Offers on delivery are one of the most powerful promotional tools you have at your disposal. Any promotion is your opportunity to get the customer to do what you want them to do as cheaply as possible – in other words, with minimal impact on your margins. If you are already offering free P&P on everything then use “Free upgrade to [better delivery service]” as the big promotion. A permanent free P&P offer of some sort can also be very powerful. For example, if your average order value is $50, then give anyone who spends more than $50 free P&P.

How A Good Delivery Strategy Can Encourage Repeat Purchases

E-commerces are all looking to turn buyers into repeat customers, and your delivery strategy can play a vital role in making this happen. You need to approach the first order someone places with you as a test. The customer wants to see if they can trust you, so you need to make sure you do an excellent job on the order.

This means delivering on your promises – the right goods must be delivered on time, in one piece and as promised. And that’s just the bare minimum. You also need to have a robust plan to fall back on if things go wrong. Rather than looking at it as a problem to be solved, look at every issue as an opportunity to build more trust in your brand.

If you really want to get that second order, you need to be proactive. Put a clear call to action into that package to ask for the next order and wow the customer as well. For instance, you could add

  • a copy of your catalogue (if you have one);
  • a leaflet featuring your bestselling products;
  • an offer such as free P&P on your next order, or a code for a discount on the next order.

Even if you can’t add anything to the package, you might want to consider putting a promotional message on the dispatch paperwork.

If you’re looking to wow your customers, here are a few suggestions:

  • Brand your packaging – This could be as simple as a sticker or a stamp (some find this helps recruit new customers when their parcels arrive in offices).
  • Include a surprise gift: This doesn’t need not be big or complicated. A coaster, pen, sticker or bookmark can have a big impact.
  • Wrap the products nicely in tissue paper or anything else you can do to make opening that parcel feel special.
  • Add a “packed by” card from the person who actually packed it – creating a human connection always helps.

We hope this article has helped you realize the power of delivery for an e-commerce. If you would like to learn more, or have your own online platform created by a professional team, contact Linkeo Ltd today and enquire about the Deliver By Linkeo line of products.

During the 1990s, when the internet was first coming into its own as a sales venue, online grocery businesses such as HomeGrocer and Webvan crashed and burned. It seemed like a natural fit for consumers to use the convenience of online ordering to procure their daily staples, but the traditional grocery business model didn’t translate to an internet version altogether gracefully. As digital sales have grown across the board, entrepreneurs have learned from these early experiments, making online grocery delivery more viable than it ever was. 

Online Grocery Delivery Business Plan 

Starting an online grocery delivery business will likely require outside capital because it can be an expensive undertaking. Creating a solid and thoughtful business plan will not only give you a valuable tool to present to lenders and investors but it will also provide you with an opportunity to think through important questions whose answers can be vital to your success. 

Your business plan should clearly present your short-, medium- and long-term goals and chart a path from your startup format to long-term profitability. This is an important time to think about scale. You may choose to start with a limited delivery area and a modest selection of products to avoid making a prohibitive investment right away. Alternately, if you have considerable experience in the grocery industry or in online marketing, you may opt to pull out the stops and go big right away, which will require you to purchase infrastructure and do enough initial advertising to make a splash. 

 Whichever trajectory you choose, preparing an online grocery delivery business plan will increase your odds of success by forcing you to do research on the industry. This information will show you where there are openings for new and established models that either build on past successes or offer alternatives to historical mistakes. The financial statement and financial projection section of your business plan will allow you to play out scenarios, including forecasting how much business you will need to transact to break even. 

Online Grocery Delivery Platforms 

Your online grocery’s platform will be the storefront where actual and potential customers will browse your offerings and place their orders. It should be relatively easy to navigate so customers can find what they’re looking for without growing frustrated and abandoning their cart. At the same time, it should be able to offer suggestions and anticipate customers’ needs and shopping patterns to maximize sales and build on existing preferences. 

If you’re reading an article about the online grocery industry rather than hiring a team of consultants, you’re probably going to start relatively small, with limited infrastructure and capacity. It can be prohibitively expensive to launch a venture that can realistically compete with large grocery chains, so if your resources are limited, your best bet will probably be to narrow your focus and appeal to potential customers who are most likely to want and need what you offer. Your grocery delivery business software should reflect these choices. 

Your website should also clearly communicate the parameters and limitations of your service while also emphasizing what you do offer. It’s frustrating for a customer to choose a cart full of products only to learn at checkout that you don’t deliver to that customer’s address. A friendly and informative page for frequently asked questions can help to clear up many of these misunderstandings. 

Grocery Delivery Storage 

Even though your grocery delivery business will take orders online, you will still pack and deliver from a brick-and-mortar location. Unlike specialty art purchased online, groceries are typically purchased because a customer has an immediate or short-term need. You can wait a few extra days to receive an urn or a painting, but if your grocery delivery is delayed, you still have to figure out what to eat for dinner. For this reason, it is critical to have enough inventory on hand to fill orders without having to wait for your stock to be replenished. 

At the same time, if you order too much of a perishable product and your customers don’t order enough of the item, you’ll likely get stuck with items that have passed their pull date. You can still sell products that are close to their expiration dates, but doing so could have an effect on your ability to attract repeat customers because if their food turns bad before they can eat it, they’ll be unlikely to order from you again. 

You’ll certainly need enough shelving and grocery space to hold and rotate your inventory. If your business sells refrigerated and frozen offerings, you’ll also need commercial refrigerators and freezers, which can be expensive. Assess your needs realistically and try to find a sweet spot between taxing your resources by building too much capacity and limiting your growth potential by not planning for enough. 

Planning Grocery Delivery Routes 

The delivery arm of your business is your most tangible point of contact with customers. People order online groceries primarily for the convenience, so your delivery schedule should be convenient for your clientele. At the same time, be wary of overcommitting to meet your customers’ needs if doing so creates an unsustainable business model. It may be ideal for your customers if you have a delivery truck in every neighborhood for every two-hour window, but doing so would probably be prohibitively expensive for your business. 

You can either take the trouble to schedule delivery times when your customers will be at home or you can use a system for leaving food, ideally in a cooler if the items you deliver are perishable. However, leaving grocery deliveries unattended can be problematic if customers live in areas with high crime rates. In addition, if customers live in apartments, you may have trouble gaining access to leave groceries by their door. 

Pack orders so the first bags and boxes you deliver will be the most accessible. If you offer shelf-stable, refrigerated and frozen items as part of the same deliveries, develop a system for keeping track of an order’s different components and retrieving them efficiently at each stop. Track the time it takes to deliver each order and figure these costs into your margins and projections. 

Grocery Delivery Business Models 

Early online grocery delivery businesses such as HomeGrocer and Webvan failed in part because they were conceived by programmers rather than grocery-industry professionals. The grocery industry operates on slim margins, which weren’t sufficient to support tech-heavy platforms. Although online grocery fulfillment warehouses didn’t have to stay open the same long hours as traditional supermarkets, they did have to carry comparable levels of inventory to be able to fill any orders that arrived. 

Subsequent models have revised these early iterations to build on some of the economies of scale that the grocery industry has already achieved. Chains such as Safeway and platforms such as Amazon use physical and digital infrastructure to build onto established businesses. We R Here 4 U LLC uses its platform to provide grocery delivery from existing stores. 

Choosing a Business Name 

Online grocery delivery business names should reflect the approach that you choose for your business. Decide which aspect of your business model you’re most interested in emphasizing and choose a name that communicates this aspect, whether that be convenience, quality or quirkiness. Have a look around the internet for ideas and see what businesses are flourishing. Then apply your findings to coming up with the perfect name or you. 

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